Environmental Protection – G Net http://gnet.org/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 04:59:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Environmental Protection – G Net http://gnet.org/ 32 32 Penn biologists create method to correct publicly collected datasets https://gnet.org/penn-biologists-create-method-to-correct-publicly-collected-datasets/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 04:29:06 +0000 https://gnet.org/penn-biologists-create-method-to-correct-publicly-collected-datasets/ The Daily Pennsylvanian is a non-profit, student-run organization. Please support us by disabling your ad blocker on our site. Penn biologists led a research team that found a way to correct a set of data collected by members of the public to create a map of ticks transmitting Lyme disease in the northeast. Credit: Mélanie […]]]>

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Penn biologists led a research team that found a way to correct a set of data collected by members of the public to create a map of ticks transmitting Lyme disease in the northeast.

Credit: Mélanie Hilman

A research team led by biologists at Penn has found a way to correct a set of data collected by members of the public to create a map of ticks transmitting Lyme disease in the northeast.

Data collected by the public is normally corrected by controlling for factors related to the collector, such as the collector’s experience and education level, Penn Today reported. The research team did not have this information, so they instead used county-level demographics and other factors, including a county’s median household income, population size, and location. racial demographics.

Apps and websites like eBird and iNaturalist allow members of the public to act as “citizen scientists” by documenting their observations on a wide range of natural phenomena, Penn Today reported. This data greatly exceeds the amount of data collected by professional scientists. However, the presence of collector bias decreases the quality of the data and their usefulness in scientific research.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses are on the increase. Over the past 20 years, the range of the blacklegged tick, which is responsible for most cases of Lyme disease, has more than doubled. New species of ticks and the discovery of new germs also contribute to the growing threat. The CDC recommends taking steps to protect against tick bites, such as avoiding areas with tall grass and leaf litter, using insect repellents registered by the Environmental Protection Agency, and treating dogs against it. ticks.

Pennsylvania consistently ranks among the states with the highest number of Lyme disease cases each year. The Daily Local News reported that in the spring of 2021, the Department of Environmental Protection collected twice as many blacklegged ticks compared to last year.


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‘We have a trash problem’: Governor Wolf unveils statewide trash action plan https://gnet.org/we-have-a-trash-problem-governor-wolf-unveils-statewide-trash-action-plan/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://gnet.org/we-have-a-trash-problem-governor-wolf-unveils-statewide-trash-action-plan/ Pennsylvanians take pride in the beauty the state offers, through millions of acres of forest, rolling hills and, this time of year, stunning fall scenery. But anyone who has taken the state’s roads to reach these destinations will have a hard time arguing with Governor Tom Wolf. “We have a waste problem,” Wolf said when […]]]>

Pennsylvanians take pride in the beauty the state offers, through millions of acres of forest, rolling hills and, this time of year, stunning fall scenery.

But anyone who has taken the state’s roads to reach these destinations will have a hard time arguing with Governor Tom Wolf.

“We have a waste problem,” Wolf said when announcing Pennsylvania’s first waste action plan, developed in concert with more than 100 stakeholders from state and local governments, businesses, lawmakers. , non-profit organizations and community organizations. “Waste is bad for the environment and our communities, it is a drain on taxpayer money.”

According to a 2020 study commissioned by state officials working with the nonprofit Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful, PennDOT task teams spent more than $ 65 million between 2014 and 2018 to dispose of waste and waste. debris from rights-of-way on state roads. The agency’s annual waste disposal budget is approximately $ 14 million.

“It’s money we could use to rebuild bridges, help veterans or feed people,” said Shannon Reiter, North Huntingdon resident and president of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. “We are so delighted that the governor and our partners in state agencies are taking the waste issue, the burden it places on communities, seriously and are looking to shift to a prevention strategy.”

The report identifies 16 recommendations to be addressed. Among them:

PennDOT, the Department of Economic and Community Development and the Department of Environmental Protection will collaborate on an anti-litter campaign scheduled for spring 2022.

• DEP will work on rules to provide convenient and affordable access to waste disposal and recycling services in rural areas where they are not always economically feasible.

• In addition to its “Leave No Trace” program, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources will update concessionaire agreements to try to minimize the use of disposable straws and utensils. Vendors will also be notified when composting becomes available at a state park.

• State police will continue their “Operation Clean Sweep”, launched over the summer to reinforce a zero tolerance attitude to waste control.

• The Fish & Boat Commission will introduce pilot projects to encourage the proper disposal of fishing lines.

DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell said the state could learn a lesson from the thousands of volunteer garbage cleanups that take place across Pennsylvania each year.

“If we bring the same energy to the waste prevention initiatives that thousands of volunteers have brought to cleaning up the garbage in their communities, we will take a turn in the waste problem in Pennsylvania,” McDonnell said. “And we will reap the community and economic benefits of a healthier environment. “

In order to tackle litter in urban areas, the plan offers innovative solutions like Lancaster’s ‘Tiny Can Project’, where city authorities have installed miniature bins every few houses on both sides of the street in three targeted areas. . Residents with a “small can” outside their home agreed to empty it on garbage day with their regular garbage collection.

Stakeholders are hoping the plan can help solve what Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful estimates is half a billion trash strewn across the state.

“We recognize that we need to change behavior, not just clean up the mess,” said PennDOT Secretary Yassmin Gramian. “With this Commonwealth Litter action Plan, we’ve provided examples, resources, and calls to action so we can make transformative change here in Pennsylvania. “

Read the full plan at DEP.pa.gov.

Patrick Varine is an editor at Tribune-Review. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, pvarine@triblive.com or via Twitter .



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MassDEP Determines Win Waste Innovations Does Not Meet Ash Landfill Expansion Criteria https://gnet.org/massdep-determines-win-waste-innovations-does-not-meet-ash-landfill-expansion-criteria/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 20:15:13 +0000 https://gnet.org/massdep-determines-win-waste-innovations-does-not-meet-ash-landfill-expansion-criteria/ Austin, Texas and Philadelphia are the next cities to join Beyond 34: Scaling Circularity for a Sustainable Economy, the multi-stakeholder initiative of the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Austin and Philadelphia were chosen because of their commitment to sustainability and the opportunity that exists to make a significant economic and environmental impact through circular solutions, […]]]>

Austin, Texas and Philadelphia are the next cities to join Beyond 34: Scaling Circularity for a Sustainable Economy, the multi-stakeholder initiative of the US Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Austin and Philadelphia were chosen because of their commitment to sustainability and the opportunity that exists to make a significant economic and environmental impact through circular solutions, according to the foundation.

Exacerbated by COVID-induced labor shortages, supply chain disruptions and changing consumption patterns, U.S. waste collection systems continue to face major challenges, rate recycling rate in the United States has hovered around 30% in recent decades. To help address these issues, Beyond 34 provides a model of high-impact waste management solutions that can be scaled up for implementation in regions across the country, according to the State Chamber of Commerce Foundation. -United.

Beyond 34 was launched in Orlando, Florida in 2017 with funding from the Walmart Foundation, Target, Republic Services and Walgreens in conjunction with Resource Recycling Systems (RRS), Ann Arbor, Michigan. In 2019, it expanded to Cincinnati and aims to demonstrate how to optimize the recycling and recovery of high-value materials generated from commercial, industrial and residential sources.

“For five years, the Beyond 34 initiative has helped communities improve their local recycling, reuse and recovery rates and provided a collaborative platform for the business community to lead the development of solutions that advance l circular economy in the United States, “said Marc DeCourcey, senior vice president of the Washington-based US Chamber Foundation. “We welcome Austin and Philadelphia as the new cities to join our movement and we look forward to seeing the progress they make. “

The foundation says Beyond 34 helps communities and businesses build sustainable local economies by applying a three-phase model: involving stakeholders throughout the waste management value chain; perform analysis to identify areas with the greatest impact; and empower communities to implement solutions.

As one of America’s fastest growing cities, Austin prioritizes sustainability as the path to prosperity. The city is working towards its goal of reducing the amount of waste sent to landfills by 90% by 2040 and has a number of programs that help residents develop the local circular economy. For example, Austin hired zero waste “block leaders” to educate neighbors about recycling and composting, the plastics recycling system and more.

“We know that our ambitious goals for a circular economy here in Austin cannot be achieved alone. We need the support of our nonprofit partners, companies that share our values, and other cities that can pass on their own wisdom – we are all ears and we want to learn, ”said Steve Adler, Mayor of Austin. “That’s why we jumped at the opportunity to be a part of the US Chamber Foundation’s exciting work as part of the Beyond 34 initiative.”

Philadelphia is committed to achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 and is striving to become 90% zero waste and waste free by 2035. Philadelphia uses data through its SmartCityPHL program to help it become more efficient and improve the quality of life of its residents. .

“We are working diligently to make the ‘smart city’ a holistic planning paradigm in Philadelphia, much like the term ‘sustainability’ has become,” says Mark Wheeler, chief information officer for the city. “We need innovative technologies, quality data and partnerships, especially partnerships like those of the Beyond 34 initiative, to achieve a local circular economy that will provide fair employment opportunities, create resilient communities and will support global climate goals. ”

The Chamber of Commerce Foundation says that through tools like the Beyond 34 Recycling and Salvage Resource Center, cities across the country can learn from other regions that are tackling barriers and taking action towards the waste disposal.

Since its launch, The Coca-Cola Co., Coca-Cola Consolidated, Kroger Co., Dow, the Plastics Industry Association, Procter and Gamble, Republic Services, Target, Walgreens Boots Alliance and the Walmart Foundation have supported the Beyond 34 program, with Walmart.org and Walgreens funding expansion to Austin and Philadelphia.

“The Beyond 34 model provides important information and resources to cities and regions across the country,” says Chelsea Scantlan, sustainability program manager at Walmart.org. “The Walmart Foundation is proud to support the expansion of Beyond 34 in Austin and Philadelphia. Strong policies and public sector activities to reduce waste are essential complements to private sector investments. Shifting to behaving and operating in a circular economy will require everyone to strategically work together, exactly the kind of systemic change that we strive to enable at The Walmart Foundation. “

“Beyond 34 is a perfect way to bring together like-minded people to solve problems like waste, recycling and problematic plastics,” said John Kotlarczyk, senior director, waste reduction, Walgreens Boots Alliance. “By collaborating with members of the communities we serve and other businesses in those communities, we are confident that we can make an impact. By lending our support, we are not only doing our part, but we also hope to inspire others to do their part as well. “


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Hawaiian groups want US to shut down military fuel tanks https://gnet.org/hawaiian-groups-want-us-to-shut-down-military-fuel-tanks/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 03:38:33 +0000 https://gnet.org/hawaiian-groups-want-us-to-shut-down-military-fuel-tanks/ HONOLULU (AP) – Citing threats to drinking water in Honolulu, the Sierra Club of Hawaii and other groups on Wednesday called on President Joe Biden and military leaders to shut down tanks which constitute a large reserve of fuel for US forces in the Pacific. “Enough is enough. We have lost all faith in the […]]]>

HONOLULU (AP) – Citing threats to drinking water in Honolulu, the Sierra Club of Hawaii and other groups on Wednesday called on President Joe Biden and military leaders to shut down tanks which constitute a large reserve of fuel for US forces in the Pacific.

“Enough is enough. We have lost all faith in the local command of the Navy,” Wayne Tanaka, director of the Sierra Club of Hawaii, said at a rally and press conference.

The military built 20 fuel tanks, each equivalent to 25 floors, during World War II near Pearl Harbor on top of an aquifer that supplies a quarter of Honolulu with potable water.

The call to shut them down comes after a string of recent revelations about fuel leaks associated with fuel tanks at Red Hill or Pearl Harbor.

Tanaka called the reservoirs “an unacceptable threat to the drinking water supply of 400,000 Oahu residents.”

The Hawaii Navy region said in a statement it is committed to protecting the environment and drinking water while protecting national security.

“We will be closely monitoring all aspects of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility to ensure the safety of our operations,” he said.

On Monday, the Navy said 14,000 gallons (52,995 liters) of a mixture of water and fuel seeped into the lower tunnel at the Red Hill facility from a system drain line. fire extinguishing. No fuel leakage into the environment.

Last month, Honolulu Civil Beat reported that authorities waited months to report a January leak at Pearl Harbor to the State Department of Health “for fear that it would hamper its ability to obtain a license to” State ”for the Red Hill reservoirs.

Hawaii’s four-member congressional delegation asked the Department of Defense inspector general to investigate the January leak, saying it wanted to know if the Navy had properly investigated and informed authorities of the ‘State.

Last month, the state’s health department fined the Navy more than $ 325,000 for violations of Red Hill’s operations and maintenance.

A fuel leak in 2014 prompted the Navy to sign an agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency and the State Department of Health to upgrade tanks and better prevent and detect leaks.


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More degraded waters should be a call to action https://gnet.org/more-degraded-waters-should-be-a-call-to-action/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 12:16:00 +0000 https://gnet.org/more-degraded-waters-should-be-a-call-to-action/ November 23 — Scientific study required when reviewing environmental laws and regulations. When it comes to our lakes, rivers and streams, there have been decades of studies, most of which have found the same disheartening results. The state recently added 304 lakes and streams to its list of degraded waters, bringing the total to nearly […]]]>

November 23 — Scientific study required when reviewing environmental laws and regulations.

When it comes to our lakes, rivers and streams, there have been decades of studies, most of which have found the same disheartening results.

The state recently added 304 lakes and streams to its list of degraded waters, bringing the total to nearly 3,000.

In Blue Earth County alone, eight newly identified water quality issues brought the total number to 140, including mercury found in fish tissue on portions of the Le Sueur River and deterioration of fish habitat. fish on Madison and Lura lakes.

The biennial compilation of deteriorated water is required by the Environmental Protection Agency and provides information to federal and state agencies to create pollutant reduction plans. These regulations often add limits to “point” pollution – things like pipes from industrial factories and water from city streets and parking lots.

In the world of pollution reduction, this is relatively easy to do. State and federal agencies have a variety of rules governing cities and industries that can be used to demand greater reductions in pollutants – such as forcing cities to reduce their phosphorus emissions from their treatment plants. But it has put too much of a financial burden on cities and their taxpayers with smaller and smaller benefits to show for it.

While regulations have dramatically reduced pollution from point sources, the elephant in the room is the “non-point” source of pollution. In much of Minnesota, this pollution comes from agriculture, mining, logging, and clearing land for development.

While regulators have many tools to limit point pollution, they have less legal power to regulate diffuse pollution, relying mainly on voluntary programs.

When state legislation is proposed to address issues such as runoff from agricultural land, it is most often hampered by effective lobbying efforts.

Some groups have worked mightily to try to find ways to make things better. The Minnesota River Congress, led by Scott Sparlin, was successful in convincing lawmakers to include $ 2 million to provide financial assistance to landowners in the watershed to store more water on farmland.

It is a success to be celebrated and it should be expanded with more state and federal funding.

But five decades after the passage of the Clean Water Act, it’s clear that real progress in improving the state’s water will require much more. This can only happen when citizens exert enough pressure on lawmakers to pass meaningful legislation to reduce diffuse pollution – enough pressure to counter the lobbying efforts of those who oppose it.


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Roswell Council votes to move forward with sewer project https://gnet.org/roswell-council-votes-to-move-forward-with-sewer-project/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 14:25:32 +0000 https://gnet.org/roswell-council-votes-to-move-forward-with-sewer-project/ ROSWELL – Roswell Village Council has voted to allow the Tuscarawas County Water and Sewer District to proceed with the planning and engineering of a sanitary sewer system for the village. Thursday’s vote was unanimous by the five board members present: Justin Eggerton, Mackenzie Pringle, Larry Pringle, Mitch Belknap and board chair Dennis Leggett. Councilor […]]]>

ROSWELL – Roswell Village Council has voted to allow the Tuscarawas County Water and Sewer District to proceed with the planning and engineering of a sanitary sewer system for the village.

Thursday’s vote was unanimous by the five board members present: Justin Eggerton, Mackenzie Pringle, Larry Pringle, Mitch Belknap and board chair Dennis Leggett.

Councilor Amanda Leggett has been excused due to a reception at the family school.

Belknap said he and Eggerton conducted a village-wide investigation into residents’ feelings about the sewer project. The survey resulted in 54 households in favor of the project and 15 against.

Eggerton then said he felt they needed to move forward with the project or risked being cited by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in heavy fines for the village.


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What’s going on with the incorrect ‘electric vehicles are bad for the environment’ message lately? https://gnet.org/whats-going-on-with-the-incorrect-electric-vehicles-are-bad-for-the-environment-message-lately/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 07:19:25 +0000 https://gnet.org/whats-going-on-with-the-incorrect-electric-vehicles-are-bad-for-the-environment-message-lately/ There seems to be a new wave of FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) spreading about EVs these days. And it’s either by “environmental groups” or other groups pushing environmental groups to “lead the charge” against electric vehicles. In Germany you have “environmental groups” not in my backyard that seem to focus solely on preventing Tesla […]]]>

There seems to be a new wave of FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) spreading about EVs these days. And it’s either by “environmental groups” or other groups pushing environmental groups to “lead the charge” against electric vehicles. In Germany you have “environmental groups” not in my backyard that seem to focus solely on preventing Tesla from starting Giga Berlin.

Tesla sells more electric vehicles than any other company on this planet and it would make sense for environmental groups to want more clean electric vehicles on the roads instead of toxic gases and diesel that spew greenhouse gases and air pollution. Yet some minor niche organizations that claim to focus on environmental issues have recently attacked electric vehicles.

In June, a conservative nonprofit, CFACT, which claims to focus on protecting the earth, published an article filled with false information and false claims about electric vehicles. Some of these claims included that electric vehicles can never be produced in the numbers the government wants (think “at scale”), that there will never be enough charging stations, that too many are needed. time to charge an electric vehicle and you’ll have to cancel every road trip you think you can make, that the average consumer will never be able to afford an EV, and much more. Wild stuff in 2021.

A new article – an opinion piece published by The hill – suggests environmentalists should lead the charge versus electric vehicles. The article claims that if you really care about human rights and want to protect the environment, you should stop investing in plug-in electric vehicles. He quoted Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda, who spoke of “brutal realities of SVEs”. Oddly enough, it was written by a member of the Environmental Protection Agency’s science advisory board, which also sits on the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission. Well, appointments aside, the writer is a senior member of a conservative think tank.

The article also stated that electric vehicles are no more efficient than gasoline vehicles, which is a shocking claim. Steve Hanley wrote about this in 2018. Here is part of that article:

“According to the US Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,“ EVs convert approximately 59% to 62% of grid electrical energy into power at the wheels. Conventional gasoline vehicles only convert about 17% to 21% of the energy stored in gasoline into power at the wheels. “

So, yes, no, gasoline and diesel cars are not more efficient.

Curiously, the writing of the play in The hill quoted that CleanTechnica article stating that “all-electric vehicles are no more efficient than gasoline-powered vehicles.”

The author also omitted the part where Steve added:

“An electric motor is generally between 85% and 90% efficient. This means that it converts this percentage of the electricity supplied to it into useful work. The difference between the efficiency of the engine and the overall efficiency of an electric car is taken into account for the losses attributed to the charging and discharging of the battery and, for some loads (for some cars), to the conversion. from alternating current to direct current and vice versa.

Distorting what Steve was saying, the author of this opinion piece continued:

“They are greedy on natural resources, exacerbate social injustices and make no sense unless the governors of the blue states stop strangling the United States’ natural gas supply. Investing in SVEs makes no sense in the context of “green” ESG principles. “

The author talks about human rights, and I think that’s important. Human rights are essential and every business, no matter what industry, must do its part to ensure that there are no violations of rights. However, the author does not mention the actual cobalt problem or the responses of the electric vehicle industry to this problem. It vaguely talks about cobalt, nickel and lithium and the fact that countries don’t have the same environmental restrictions as we do. Although he is right, he ignores the fact that Tesla has a human rights protocol that he strictly observes (I mention Tesla because it is the best-selling producer of electric vehicles and the leader of the industry) and other automakers have similar approaches to the problem. . The author spoke of the horrors of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, but does not mention the progress that Tesla, Panasonic and others have made in reducing the amount of cobalt used in their batteries and not extracting cobalt from it.

Panasonic’s Shoichiro Watanabe, Head of Energy Technology and Manufacturing at Panasonic, shared a presentation this year that I recently wrote about. He explained how Panasonic’s research and development (R&D) laboratory found that cobalt-free cathodes achieved the same level of service life as Panasonic nickel-cobalt-aluminum battery cells.

While there is a global problem in which not all countries believe human rights should be protected, companies like Tesla have come a long way to use only ethically sourced materials. The message Tesla sends is clear. If you want Tesla to be a customer, don’t use child slaves or unethically mined materials. A quick glance at Tesla’s Conflict Minerals report will show that it only sources responsibly produced materials. In his SEC filing, Tesla said:

“This means having safe and humane working conditions in our supply chain and ensuring that workers are treated with respect and dignity. “

The author pointed out that a large part of the electricity production in this country comes from natural gas, and it is true. However, wind and solar power are now cheaper and dominate new electric capacity in the United States. Large-scale solar power has the lowest discounted cost of energy (LCOE) in the United States compared to all, according to the Lazards 2021 updated cost of energy analysis. other sources. In any case, even if they are powered by natural gas power plants, electric vehicles are much more environmentally friendly than gasoline / diesel cars.

The author also asserted that the poor will never be able to afford an electric vehicle. The idea that the poor can’t afford an EV is silly. If you can afford a car, then you can afford a car. If you can’t afford it, you can’t afford it. If you can afford a car, the total cost of owning an electric vehicle can be competitive with mainstream cars like the Honda CRV and Toyota Corolla.

Using the poor and poverty to spread FUD is something I am more than happy to talk about. Saying “oh the poor won’t be able to pay their electricity bills if we switch to clean energy” is silly. The poor will also not be able to pay their hospital costs for cancer. There’s proof of it right here in Louisiana.

The fossil fuel industry is killing people and this planet, and pretending it doesn’t or intentionally not including it while pushing against electric vehicles (which are more environmentally friendly than anyone which ICE vehicle) is an outright lie. So don’t attack us with this “poor people will be punished if we switch to clean energy” mess.

There is a lot more to this article that is misleading and even weird, but we won’t even waste time on that.

The question I ask myself is the following:

Who does it benefit from?

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Restoration of an accessible trail at the Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center | Local Ads https://gnet.org/restoration-of-an-accessible-trail-at-the-stony-kill-farm-environmental-education-center-local-ads/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 16:39:08 +0000 https://gnet.org/restoration-of-an-accessible-trail-at-the-stony-kill-farm-environmental-education-center-local-ads/ WAPPINGERS FALLS – New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the restoration and improvement of an accessible trail at the Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center in Wappingers Falls in Dutchess County. The half-mile Woodland Trail was destroyed by a microburst in May 2018, and repaired and improved through a […]]]>

WAPPINGERS FALLS – New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the restoration and improvement of an accessible trail at the Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center in Wappingers Falls in Dutchess County.

The half-mile Woodland Trail was destroyed by a microburst in May 2018, and repaired and improved through a collaborative effort to make the trail more accessible to people of all skill levels.

“The restored Woodland Trail is proof of New York State’s continued commitment to ensuring the outdoors are open to all,” said Commissioner Seggos. “The hard work of the Excelsior Conservation Corps and our regional operations staff has made this trail accessible to people of all skill levels, and I expect many visitors to enjoy it in the years to come. I congratulate the young people who have restored this trail. They have rendered a meaningful public service and have helped protect the state’s natural resources and enhance its economic well-being.

The Woodland Trail was wheelchair accessible before a microburst that blew up trees and made the trail unusable.

DEC operations staff helped clear some trees, but the trail was no longer safe for people in wheelchairs or with reduced mobility.

DEC provided the materials, equipment, staff guidance, and reviews by DEC’s accessibility coordinator needed to complete the project, and the Excelsior Conservation Corps (ECC) spent last summer in restore the trail to meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.

Located next to the parking lot next to the mansion, the trail is filled with stone dust with open space for classes.

“We are very grateful for the work of the Excelsior Conservation Corps in reviving the Woodland Trail and making it accessible to people with reduced mobility,” said Erik Fyfe, executive director of the Stony Kill Foundation.

“Stony Kill is such a great destination, and upgrades like this help make the farm and the forests more accessible for everyone!”

The announced improvements complement the first phase of the project, with $ 2,800 provided by the state’s Environmental Protection Fund.

The second phase of the project, scheduled for 2022, includes the installation of interpretive panels and benches.

The ECC is a program of AmeriCorps that completes stewardship projects on DEC lands and facilities and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation open to the public.

The Student Conservation Association (SCA) manages the ECC, which currently manages three teams of members aged 18-26 under the supervision of a team leader.

The 16 crew members received training in Logging Game 1 and 2, Wilderness First Aid, Conservation Work Skills, Leave No Trace ™ Sustainable Recreation Principles and Basic Carpentry.

In addition to working at the Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center, corps members completed projects at DEC’s Camp DeBruce, Sugar Hill State Forest, Honeoye Inlet Wildlife Management Area, and Parks. State of Palisades and Finger Lakes Regions.

Teams created new trails, maintained and improved existing trails, eliminated invasive species, restored cabins, repaired a lean-to, installed bridges and culverts, and surveyed public lands.

The ECC is funded by the Federal AmeriCorps program and the Environmental Protection Fund.

Members receive housing and live and work in teams of up to six.

They are used from May to early December on shipyards in New York State. At the end of their service, members are eligible for a scholarship that can be used to reduce existing student loans or to pay for future education.

The Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center is operated by the Stony Kill Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to educate the public and cultivate environmental stewardship through the interpretation of the rich historical, environmental heritage and farm of Stony Kill Farm.

The Foundation’s educational and community programs include field trips, home schooling and scouting programs, workshops, guided trips and special events.

Each year, more than 19,000 people connect for hands-on experiences in nature and sustainable agriculture at Stony Kill.

As a working farm, the Foundation helps restore heritage brands of cattle, sheep, chickens and turkeys.

The farm is home to a learning center, a tenant farm from the mid-1700s, an Italian-style mansion from 1842, and a barn from the 1800s.

The grounds and seven trails are open from dawn to dusk, 365 days a year.

For more information on the farm and education programs, visit Stonykill.org.

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Overnight Energy & Environment – Biden maintains rule on Trump-era aircraft emissions https://gnet.org/overnight-energy-environment-biden-maintains-rule-on-trump-era-aircraft-emissions/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 01:06:07 +0000 https://gnet.org/overnight-energy-environment-biden-maintains-rule-on-trump-era-aircraft-emissions/ Welcome to Tuesday’s show on energy and the environment, your source for the latest news focused on energy, the environment and beyond. Subscribe here: thehill.com/newsletter-inscription. Today we look at the Biden administration’s decision to retain Trump-era aircraft emissions standards, a finding by the EPA that two types of “forever chemicals” are more toxic than not […]]]>

Welcome to Tuesday’s show on energy and the environment, your source for the latest news focused on energy, the environment and beyond. Subscribe here: thehill.com/newsletter-inscription.

Today we look at the Biden administration’s decision to retain Trump-era aircraft emissions standards, a finding by the EPA that two types of “forever chemicals” are more toxic than not previously thought and the offshore oil and gas rental sale of tomorrow.

For The Hill, we are Rachel Frazin and Zack Budryk. Write to us with tips: rfrazin@thehill.com and zbudryk@thehill.com. Follow us on twitter: @RachelFrazin and @BudrykZack.

Let’s go.

EPA sticks to Trump-era aircraft standards

The Biden administration in a court case Monday night said it would uphold Trump-era regulations on greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) filed the case Monday as part of a multi-state lawsuit filed in the dying days of the Trump administration. In the lawsuit, the EPA said it would not begin a new rulemaking process for the rule, proposed in July 2020.

In a statement, the EPA defended the move and said it understands the need for further action to reduce aviation emissions.

“This is why the United States will push for ambitious new international CO2 standards in the next round of ICAO negotiations, why in September the Biden administration announced a series of actions to boost the development of sustainable aviation fuel, and why earlier this month, the Biden The US administration released the US aviation climate action plan at COP26, ”the statement read.

The agency added that it would explore other possible actions under the Clean Air Act, which is independent of International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards.

The Trump administration’s rule, which would implement ICAO standards, has been heavily criticized by conservationists, who note that it would do little to significantly reduce emissions of aviation. The agency itself wrote in 2020 that it “does not anticipate any emission reductions associated with the GHG regulations proposed today.”

Learn more about the ruling here.

“FOREVER CHEMICALS” MORE TOXIC THAN THOUGHT IN THE FOREFRONT: EPA

New draft reports from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have found that two “forever chemicals” are more toxic than previously thought, and that one is likely carcinogenic to humans.

The drafts revealed that the safe ingestion levels for the chemicals PFOA and PFOS are much lower than those the agency found in previous assessments.

The agency also found that PFOA is “probably” carcinogenic to humans. This is a step forward, as it has already been said that there is “suggestive” evidence that the substance can cause cancer.

PFOA and PFOS can be found in drinking water, as well as in other substances. PFOA has been used in non-stick cookware, flame retardants, and cosmetics. PFOS has been used in water and stain resistant products.

The latest findings are part of an effort by the EPA to regulate the substances, with the agency saying it will aim to complete drinking water limits for PFOA and PFOS in 2023.

Scott Faber, senior vice president of government affairs at the environmental task force, told The Hill that the stronger toxicity finding is a sign the agency will issue strict regulations.

“There is no turning back. The evidence is now overwhelming that PFAS is toxic at very low levels and that tens of millions, if not hundreds of millions of Americans have dangerous levels of PFOA, especially in their drinking water, ”said Faber.

Learn more about the new releases here.

The interior prepares for the sale of the drilling lease

The Biden administration will hold its first sale of new oil and gas leases on Wednesday since implementing a now-reversed pause on lease sales earlier this year.

The sale will auction over 15,000 blocks in the Gulf of Mexico. The department is holding out in response to a court ruling ending its moratorium on leases after Republican-led states sued the administration over it.

Still, the sale is being pushed back by environmentalists and some Democrats, who argue that if the lease sale is to take place, it should do so under more stringent regulations.

House natural resources committee chair Raúl Grijalva (D-Arizona) lamented what he described as “lax” environmental and safety standards under which leases would be operated.

But, he said, he would rather see the Biden administration shut down altogether while the department appeals the court ruling rather than just making a modified sale.

“I think that should be left on hold,” he told The Hill.

Asked for comment, Interior spokeswoman Melissa Schwartz declined to respond directly to criticism. But she noted in a statement that the government is appealing the court ruling and highlighted other efforts by the ministry to limit emissions from future lease sales.

“The department is complying with a US district court ruling on sale 257 while the government is appealing the decision. At the same time, Interior is conducting a more comprehensive analysis of the greenhouse gas impacts from potential oil and gas concession sales than ever before, ”said Schwartz.

She particularly highlighted the efforts of the Bureau of Land Management to take into account cumulative greenhouse gas emissions – or how those emissions will impact the country’s national emissions targets as a whole – and the use by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management for updated emission models.

IN THE PRESS FOR TOMORROW

  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee to Hold Hearing on Martha Williams’ Appointment to Head Fish and Wildlife Service
  • House Science, Space and Technology Committee to hold hearing on nuclear fusion energy research

Check out our Virtual Event on the US Economic Recovery – Thursday, November 18 at 1:00 p.m. ET

Rising consumer prices, product shortages and workforce inconsistencies are shaking the US economic recovery. Yet the economy has created more than four million jobs this year and wages continue to rise. What role will consumers and businesses play in the economic recovery and how will they emerge from the crisis? What is the domestic growth forecast for next year? Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-Md.), Rep. Dave Schweikert (R-Arizona), ADP Chief Economist, Dr Nela Richardson and Princeton Economist Janet Currie Join Steve Clemons of The Hill for a discussion on the new economic landscape and the changing workforce. RSVP today.

WHAT WE READ

  • Floods and nuclear waste eat away at the ancestral home of a tribe, The New York Times reports
  • Proponents of clean energy fear the tax plan will hurt growth, E&E news reports
  • The German regulator puts the brakes on Nord Stream 2 in a new blow to the gas pipeline, Reuters reports
  • The main US environmental regulator will visit the neighborhoods of Houston where black and Latino residents are the most polluted, Houston Public Media Reports
  • Environmental groups plan to sue the city of Florida for wastewater discharges, WTSP Reports

ICYMI

Duckworth touts drinking water infrastructure fund in bipartite bill

And finally, something quirky and quirky: Armageddon

That’s all for today, thanks for reading. Discover The Hill’s energy and environment page for the latest news and coverage. Well see you tomorrow.



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MNR accepts applications for diesel reduction projects https://gnet.org/mnr-accepts-applications-for-diesel-reduction-projects/ https://gnet.org/mnr-accepts-applications-for-diesel-reduction-projects/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 11:36:35 +0000 https://gnet.org/mnr-accepts-applications-for-diesel-reduction-projects/ The Department of Natural Resources (MNR) accepts applications for projects that reduce diesel emissions and improve air quality and human health. Applications will be accepted until Jan. 7, 2022 with approximately $ 320,000 available to fund Wisconsin-based projects to reduce emissions. According to a press release from MNR, funding for the projects will be supported […]]]>

The Department of Natural Resources (MNR) accepts applications for projects that reduce diesel emissions and improve air quality and human health. Applications will be accepted until Jan. 7, 2022 with approximately $ 320,000 available to fund Wisconsin-based projects to reduce emissions.

According to a press release from MNR, funding for the projects will be supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The agency began providing subsidies for clean diesel in 2008 under the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, a subsidy program developed by Congress under the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The statement said the programs subsidies to reduce diesel emissions have reduced carbon dioxide emissions in Wisconsin. of more than 625,000 tonnes since the start of the programs.

In 2019, Governor Tony Evers issued two executive orders focused on clean energy and tackling climate change. Decree 38 called for the establishment of a Sustainability and Clean Energy Office. The office was responsible for ensuring that all electricity consumed in Wisconsin was 100% carbon-free by 2050, aligning the state’s targets with the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, as well as with developing a clean energy plan. Executive Order No. 52 established the State Climate Change Task Force chaired by Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes.

The financing of projects to reduce diesel emissions is in line with the objectives set by these decrees, specifies the MRN. Gail Good, MNR Air Management Director, said: “MNR continues to participate in this grant program due to very beneficial results such as encouraging diesel operators to implement reduction strategies. emissions to improve our state’s air quality while preserving public health and reducing fuel consumption. . “In addition to reducing diesel emissions by more than 625,000 tonnes, the programs have also resulted in more than $ 284 million in savings on health care costs and saved more than 54 million gallons of diesel fuel. .

The DNR announcement comes as the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26, concludes in Glasgow, Scotland. Advocates say more effort is needed to avoid crossing a temperature limit of 1.5 ° C. Exceeding this limit, scientists warn, would catastrophically worsen the impacts of climate change. Laurent Fabius, the former French foreign minister who oversaw the Paris climate agreement, stressed that, “under the current circumstances [targets] needs to be improved next year. Current plans would lead to a temperature increase of 2.4 ° C, according to an analysis by Climate Action Tracker. Russ Bennett, an environmental activist who has participated in climate-related protests and resistance actions in Wisconsin, called climate change a “great pain.”

RECEIVE MORNING TICKETS IN YOUR RECEPTION BOX


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