Environmental Funds – G Net http://gnet.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:14:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Environmental Funds – G Net http://gnet.org/ 32 32 4 Big Ways the Cut Inflation Act is investing in rural America https://gnet.org/4-big-ways-the-cut-inflation-act-is-investing-in-rural-america/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:53:35 +0000 https://gnet.org/4-big-ways-the-cut-inflation-act-is-investing-in-rural-america/ To fight climate change, the United States is making a historic investment in farmers, ranchers, and rural communities, helping them reduce emissions, prepare for the climate impacts already here, and create good jobs along the way. road. The Cut Inflation Act will direct about $20 billion toward agricultural conservation programs and nearly $14 billion toward […]]]>

To fight climate change, the United States is making a historic investment in farmers, ranchers, and rural communities, helping them reduce emissions, prepare for the climate impacts already here, and create good jobs along the way. road.

The Cut Inflation Act will direct about $20 billion toward agricultural conservation programs and nearly $14 billion toward clean energy for rural America.

To stabilize the climate and maintain a safe and vibrant planet, we need to shift to climate-smart agriculture and clean energy. The new legislation will accelerate efforts already underway and launch new ones.

Here are the Inflation Reduction Act’s most impactful climate investments in rural America.

1. Open the door for more farmers to use conservation programs

US Department of Agriculture conservation programs are underfunded and oversubscribed. On average, three farmers wish to participate for each available slot.

With the additional funding from the Inflation Reduction Act, the USDA can open the door wider, allowing more farmers to participate in conservation programs.

These are farmers who already enjoy conservation but need financial or technical assistance to make the transition. The increased funding should enable climate-smart practices to be put on the ground quickly.

Equally important, tackling climate change is now a stated priority for these conservation programs, with guidance in law to prioritize practices that reduce methane and nitrous oxide and help store carbon in floors.

These programs will continue to prioritize other vitally important conservation outcomes like clean water when considering farmers’ applications, but now climate change will also be on the list.

2. Create a solid foundation for the next Farm Bill

The Farm Bill — a gigantic bill that comes around every five years that largely determines what food we eat and how it’s grown — is the biggest single source of funding for conservation on private land. . It is a powerful vehicle for reducing emissions and building resilience to the impacts of climate change nationwide.

The Cut Inflation Act extends funding for conservation programs authorized by the 2018 Farm Bill and makes additional investments in conservation.

This means that funding for critical conservation work is assured, as long as Congress avoids reversing these historic investments. Instead of focusing on preserving the amount of conservation funds available, energy can be directed towards creative ideas for advancing climate-smart agriculture.

Conservation funding from the Cut Inflation Act offers enormous potential for agricultural producers and environmentalists to work together on incentive solutions that are sustainable and equitable.

3. Measure progress to improve future investments in the fight against climate change

The Cut Inflation Act provides $300 million for the USDA’s Office of Energy and Environmental Policy to establish a program to measure the climate impact of conservation programs run by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

These funds can be used to aggregate and analyze existing data or conduct new research to improve measurement, reporting and verification on farms and within regions.

This is the decisive decade to work towards a better climate future. Having dedicated funds to measure progress is hugely important for farmers, ranchers, taxpayers and the climate. Good science and data will ensure that every dollar spent through public or private efforts has maximum impact.

4. Invest in clean rural energy to create jobs and reduce pollution

One of the most important parts of the Reducing Inflation Act — both for rural economies and for climate change — is a $14 billion investment to help rural electric farms and co-ops transition to clean energy.

This will create around 90,000 good jobs in rural communities, which have seen thousands of jobs migrate to cities in recent decades. This will not reverse the trend in itself, but it will kick-start economic revitalization and opportunity. It is also one of the biggest emission reduction opportunities in law and will make rural power grids more reliable and resilient.

The Inflation Reduction Act investments in rural America show that the United States is serious about reducing climate risks and expanding opportunities to be part of the climate solution. Over the coming decades, we will all benefit from less pollution and more resilient economies and food supplies.

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Salem Receives Funding for a Wastewater Treatment Plant | News, Sports, Jobs https://gnet.org/salem-receives-funding-for-a-wastewater-treatment-plant-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:10:28 +0000 https://gnet.org/salem-receives-funding-for-a-wastewater-treatment-plant-news-sports-jobs/ SALEM – The Salem Utilities Commission received a $221,094 grant from the Ohio Governor’s Office of Appalachia. The grant will be used to pay for part of the cost of improvements to the first phase of the water treatment plant, the total cost of which is estimated at approximately $4.5 million. The rest […]]]>

SALEM – The Salem Utilities Commission received a $221,094 grant from the Ohio Governor’s Office of Appalachia.

The grant will be used to pay for part of the cost of improvements to the first phase of the water treatment plant, the total cost of which is estimated at approximately $4.5 million. The rest of the funds will come from a loan from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Water Relief Fund. The city has already been approved and is set to receive the loan of up to $15,536,745.

The panel also discussed plans to install three SolarBees in the East Cold Run Reservoir and two in the Spring Valley Reservoir, noting that it awaits final review by Ohio EPA engineers, following that the project would be ready to go to tender.

It was also announced that the final phase three design improvement meeting was held on November 15 and the final package will be auctioned on November 30.

The cleaning of the Stewart Road reservoir by Liquid Engineering will be postponed until the spring as the company’s six certified dive crews have been reduced to one crew, according to an email received by Utilities Superintendent Don Weingart. In response, Commission Chairman Bob Hodgson instructed the department to seek out other companies in the area that could possibly perform the cleanup so that the city would have backup in case there were further delays.

Hodgson also announced that he had been advised by Robert Schreiner of Burgess and Niple that due to an error in the initial cost estimate for the East Cold Run Reservoir RIP-RAPS, the initial price estimate of about $500,000 had doubled.

The department received a grant from the Office of the Governor of Appalachia for approximately $236,000 for this project; however, the remainder of the cost will have to be paid from ministry funds.

The Authorization and Acceptance of Consent Decree between the City of Salem and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has completed its 30-day comment period, had no argument against the decree. As a result, the lawsuit against the city was officially concluded.




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As the climate heats up, a Chinese urban planner advocates ‘sponge cities’ https://gnet.org/as-the-climate-heats-up-a-chinese-urban-planner-advocates-sponge-cities/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 20:07:42 +0000 https://gnet.org/as-the-climate-heats-up-a-chinese-urban-planner-advocates-sponge-cities/ To cushion the impact of extreme weather from climate change, a Chinese landscape architect has advocated for China and other countries to create “sponge cities”. Yu Kongjian, who spoke to The Associated Press in Beijing, uses broad language to express his vision of cities that can withstand variable temperatures, drought and heavy rains. The challenges […]]]>

To cushion the impact of extreme weather from climate change, a Chinese landscape architect has advocated for China and other countries to create “sponge cities”.

Yu Kongjian, who spoke to The Associated Press in Beijing, uses broad language to express his vision of cities that can withstand variable temperatures, drought and heavy rains. The challenges to implementing this vision at a time of ambitious economic development in China are manifold.

Yu criticizes much of Asia’s modern infrastructure for being built on ideas imported from Europe, which he says are ill-suited to the monsoon climate over much of the Asian continent. He points to the recent floods that have wreaked havoc in many Asian cities, which he says are caused by this architectural mismatch.

“There’s no resilience at all,” Yu says of the concrete and steel infrastructure of big cities and the use of pipes and canals to drain water. “These are useless, they will fail and continue to fail.”

Instead, Yu proposes using natural resources, or “green infrastructure” to create water-resilient cities. This is part of a global shift among landscaping and civil engineering professionals towards closer collaboration with the natural environment. By creating large spaces to hold water in city centers — like parks and ponds — stormwater can be held in place, helping to prevent flooding, he says. Sponge infrastructure also, in theory, provides means for water to infiltrate and recharge groundwater in times of drought.

“The idea of ​​a sponge town is to recover, to give water more space,” Yu said.

A turning point in China’s awareness of climate change and urban adaptation came a decade ago, Yu said. A devastating flood hit the capital Beijing in July 2012.

Beijing’s biggest downpour in 61 years overwhelmed drainage systems, flooded downtown underpasses and caused flash flooding in the city’s outskirts. At least 77 people died.

Yu then sent a letter to Beijing Party Secretary Guo Jinlong, calling for a change in the way the government approaches the city’s infrastructure. He continued to send letters to senior officials and leaders, including Chinese leader Xi Jinping.

At a government working conference the following year, China incorporated the idea of ​​sponge cities as a national strategy, “giving full play to the absorption, storage and slow release of rainwater by ecological systems.

In 2014, the central government issued a directive: recycle 70% of runoff in 20% of urban areas by 2020, and in 80% of these areas by 2030.

The following year, it launched 16 sponge town pilot projects, adding 14 more in 2016. Officials also said they would grant 600 million yuan (83 million USD) each year for three years to municipal towns, 500 million to provincial capitals and 400 million yuan. to other cities.

The mandate and subsidies have spurred a boom in water-absorbing infrastructure, including in major cities like Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

Cities around the world are similarly trying to incorporate “biological swales” along roads, protect remaining wetland areas to absorb water, and increase rooftop rainwater catchment.

AN EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS

In China, a demonstration park is located in the northeast corner of Nanchang city in southern China. In mid-October, engineers were putting the finishing touches on a lush, scenic 126-acre park designed to cushion the impact of floods and droughts.

A former coal ash dump, the “Fish Tail” sponge park is built in a lower part of the city and is intended to regulate water to surrounding neighborhoods and business districts. Fly ash, a byproduct of burning coal, was mixed with soil to create mini-islands in the lake that allow water to seep through. Fang said the mixture, held in place by the roots of the plants, prevents the ashes from flowing into the water. Whether this prevents the release of toxic elements into the ashes is an open question.

During dry periods, water could be abstracted, purified and used for plant irrigation.

Fang Yuan, an engineer at Yu’s design institute Turenscape, said the park serves as an “ecological aquarium”, capable of holding 1 million cubic meters of water during floods and means the water can be used, rather than simply discharging it into wastewater. system.

The park also serves as a habitat for plants and wildlife disturbed by extreme weather conditions such as drought.

AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE

Sometimes the concept of sponge city has been difficult to implement in China. Misallocation of funds, lack of expertise in sponge town planning and other issues have doomed some projects.

In April, the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development announced that some cities had “insufficient awareness, inaccurate understanding and unsystematic implementation of sponge city construction”.

The notice also warned against using funds earmarked for building a sponge city for other general infrastructure projects, such as buildings and roads.

The guidelines were issued after massive rains and catastrophic flooding in the city of Zhengzhou killed 398 people last summer. Floodwaters inundated a section of the city’s subway, trapping hundreds of commuters. Rescuers flocked to the scene, but 14 people died in the subway disaster.

Notably, Zhengzhou was one of the pilot sponge cities, with a planned investment of 53.58 billion yuan ($7.4 billion). Some have wondered if the sponge town projects work.

But a State Council investigation published in January found funds had been misspent. Only 32% of the 19.6 billion yuan invested went to what the government defined as sponge town concepts.

“Even at the critical time when the whole country mobilized forces to support rescue and disaster relief in Zhengzhou, they were still ‘building flower beds,'” according to the State Council report.

Yu recognizes that there is a surveillance problem. “Many cities just use it as propaganda – just to get a lot of money from the central government,” but then invest the funds in other projects.

POYANG LAKE

While the issues of implementing absorptive cities are resolved, China’s vulnerability to extreme weather is clear. A prolonged drought since July has drastically reduced China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang.

In Tangtou village, at the northeast corner of the normally water-rich lake, residents scooped buckets of water from a village pond to tend to their vegetables.

Since July, villagers say they have seen virtually no rainfall, let alone water in their part of the lake.

“The whole lake was completely dry, and even the Yangtze River was dry,” Duan Yunzhen, 73, said as he sprinkled pond water on his crops.

“We planted rice, cotton, sesame and sweet potato – they are all suffering from drought,” said 62-year-old Hong Zuhua.

___

Associated Press video producers Olivia Zhang in Beijing and Wayne Zhang in Nanchang, China contributed to this report.

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The Associated Press’s climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. Learn more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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COP27 and climate change: what awaits us https://gnet.org/cop27-and-climate-change-what-awaits-us/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 06:52:02 +0000 https://gnet.org/cop27-and-climate-change-what-awaits-us/ As previously explained, COP 27, held this time in Egypt, began with a proposal for climate compensation. This major annual conference brings together 200 country representatives. Keep in mind that humans don’t actually have much time to waste with the climate in today’s world. The past seven years have been the hottest on record and […]]]>

As previously explained, COP 27, held this time in Egypt, began with a proposal for climate compensation.

This major annual conference brings together 200 country representatives. Keep in mind that humans don’t actually have much time to waste with the climate in today’s world. The past seven years have been the hottest on record and humanity is rapidly approaching a dangerous health and safety tipping point. A number of reports published prior to the conference offered new insights and data. Apart from that, there are important issues on the table: finances, losses and damages.

Overcoming the crisis has not only cost billions of dollars, it also means changing the way the global financial system works in all areas. At the United Nations Climate Conference in Copenhagen, developed countries pledged to mobilize $100 billion a year for climate action in developing countries. This commitment was reaffirmed in the Paris agreement, but the target has not yet been achieved. Other losses and damages occur when the impacts of climate change are irreversible. Losses and damages incurred can include extreme weather events as well as slow onset events, such as sea level rise, ocean acidification, loss of biodiversity, etc. During last year’s COP, maritime issues were the main demands of the countries of the archipelago.

The next thing to know is that all eyes will be on the big emitters. The largest group of 20% of the G20 emits about 80% of global emissions. Although many developing countries are setting ambitious goals, the world is currently waiting for developed countries to follow suit. Around the world, people want world leaders to take part in COP27 with more targeted actions and policies on the risks they face.

This COP27 meeting came after the world experienced various natural disasters, from floods that killed more than 1,700 people in Pakistan to droughts in China, Africa and the United States. Developing countries demand special “loss and damage” funds, but rich countries deny the request, an issue that has not been resolved for Denmark’s loss and damage pledge.

A June 2022 report by 55 disaster-prone countries estimated total climate-related losses over the past two decades at around $525 billion. This figure is equivalent to 20% of the total GDP of these disaster-prone countries. Some studies show that by 2030, the total loss will reach 580 billion USD. However, there is no agreement on what is calculated in terms of loss and damage in climate catastrophe.

In addition, the question of who is going to pay and who is going to receive are two very difficult things to manage because it is about money. The United States and the European Union rejected proposals in Heading 26 last year on the creation of a climate compensation fund, but agreed to dialogue without a clear end goal. Only a handful of countries provided small token funds.

Some funding from the United Nations and the Development Bank helps a little in terms of costs and damages, but not specifically for climate damages.

Developing countries proposed that loss and damage be included on the COP27 agenda. Island countries such as the Maldives and Jamaica as well as China, which are the largest CO2 emitting countries in the world, have banded together to demand the establishment of a compensation fund at COP 27. The current problem is that while the proposal from the Small Island Alliances suggests that COP 27 approve the formation of the United Nations Response Fund, which collects money from various sources to donate to countries affected by the disaster, if the climate crisis will be brought under control in the near future. Of course not, because it takes a long time to get clear about funding issues and how these funds work.

Several countries are exploring alternative payment methods after rich countries failed to provide $100 billion a year for 2020 climate finance. Another idea proposed by United Nations General Antonio Guterres is to tax the profits of companies that use fossil fuels for financing purposes.

In fact, the problem facing countries in the world today is that most of the developed countries have a very large negative impact on the environment, so it indirectly impacts the developing countries and the poor countries. The initiative of these countries is to pay some money which will be used to preserve the environmental improvements. But big dollars are a problem in the life of developing countries. Not to mention a country’s preparedness for environmental and climate damage. Big countries find it very difficult to spend money, but they know very well how to harm the environment. At the same time, for developing and poor countries, receiving funds is an important goal and mission, especially donations. Unfortunately, the funds allocated to address the climate crisis are more in the form of loans than grants. However, if they are loans, these funds must be properly allocated so that they can be returned. This begs the question “are developing countries and poor countries able to manage funds well?”

Generally speaking, major countries have not agreed to spend money on climate change, given the current state of the economy. Meanwhile, poor countries that are affected by environmental damage cannot really expect much from the management of climate finance.

Whose voice will be heard?

The Egyptian presidency is controversial due to Egypt’s poor human rights record. Since coming to power in 2013, President Abdul Fatah El Sisi’s government has overseen a widespread crackdown on dissent. Clan with Bill and British MP Caroline Lucas said, fearing that a successful conference would not be possible due to the Egyptian government’s repressive measures. It is believed that at this stage the conference will be used to cover up human rights abuses in the Egyptian state.

The reason for environmental activists is that Egypt is a country that effectively restricts public protests. Meanwhile, for environmental activists, the voice of the community is essential to gain votes and support, so COP27 in Egypt is seen as not delivering the right solution.

Indonesia at COP27.

The Indonesian government has prepared several items that can be negotiated, including:

Firstlifting of NDC.

Indonesia increased its carbon emission reduction target from 29% to 31.89% through its own efforts and from 41% to 43.2% through foreign aid in 2030. The increase in the NDC has been hit three times. In 2009, Indonesia proposed an emissions reduction target of 26% and an increase of 29% in 2016.

Secondcarbon trading.

The Minister of Environment and Forests issued Regulation No. 21/2022 on the implementation of the economic value of carbon and technical carbon trading for national and international markets. Emissions trading governed by regulation includes trading emissions through carbon caps and trades, carbon offsets, production-based payments, or other appropriate technological mechanisms.

Third, the energy transition.

Indonesia tried to organize a biomass conference in 50 power plant sites. The trick is to mix charcoal and wood or waste pellets as a generator. In addition to conferring, the pillar of the energy transition is the use of biofuel B40. This means that the composition of palm oil in biodiesel will be increased to 40% compared to diesel. In the improved document, the government targets the use or use of B40 to reach 100% by 2030. Confirmation and B40 both come from land-based products. Energy plantations require forest land, although industrial plantations can be used. Meanwhile, B40 demands more palm oil production

How do we understand

It seems that humanity today has greater and more difficult challenges to negotiate at the international level. Not only that, the solutions offered by several countries at the cop meeting are at least still very business-oriented. As at the previous COP26, efforts to “halt” the use of coal have been replaced by a gradual “reduction”. The rate of damage and the perceived negative impacts are not proportional to the mitigation efforts undertaken.

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Monroe County, NY – County Executive Bello Presents Proposed 2023 Budget https://gnet.org/monroe-county-ny-county-executive-bello-presents-proposed-2023-budget/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:54:34 +0000 https://gnet.org/monroe-county-ny-county-executive-bello-presents-proposed-2023-budget/ November 10, 2022 The $1.3 billion proposal funds key initiatives while lowering the county’s tax rate by $0.90 per $1,000 of assessed value, resulting in the highest total value rate down the county since the 1940s. See the full press release (PDF) Watch the budget presentation (video) See the proposed budget for 2023 (PDF) Monroe […]]]>

November 10, 2022

The $1.3 billion proposal funds key initiatives while lowering the county’s tax rate by $0.90 per $1,000 of assessed value, resulting in the highest total value rate down the county since the 1940s.

See the full press release (PDF)

Watch the budget presentation (video)

See the proposed budget for 2023 (PDF)

Monroe County Executive Adam Bello submitted his 2023 budget proposal to the county legislature today. The $1.34 billion proposal is a sensible spending plan that funds the county’s ongoing initiatives, recognizes the economic pressures facing county residents, and maintains the Bello administration’s focus on public safety. , public health and welfare, economic and workforce development, and infrastructure.

“My proposed budget for 2023 protects our ratepayers while ensuring we provide the important services and programs our residents have come to expect,” County Executive Bello said. “With this proposed budget, we look to the future, a reimagined future that uplifts every resident in every corner of Monroe County, makes Monroe County a destination for entrepreneurs and businesses, ensures equitable opportunities for our residents and positions Monroe County as the best place to live, work and raise a family.

Financial Highlights:

  • Year-over-year increase in spending more than 3 percentage points below inflation

  • Total value tax rate cuts $0.90 to $7.56 per $1,000 – biggest property tax drop in 30 years and lowest rate since 1947

  • The 1.2% tax levy increase is the lowest in nearly a decade and represents more than $10 million less than what is allowed under the state’s property tax cap.

Public safety — This budget:

  • Investing more in public safety with a $14 million, or 8.6%, increase to the Sheriff’s Office budget that will more than double the tactical unit’s strength, including 11 additional highway patrol deputies.

  • Adds $700,000 to expand the Rochester Threat Advisory Committee, or ROCTAC, a collaborative coalition of businesses, schools and colleges, social service agencies, mental health professionals and local law enforcement and federal organizations that work together to prevent acts of targeted violence and radicalization online. This provides for three additional deputies, bringing the total increase in deputies for 2023 to 14.

  • Provides four additional assistant district attorneys who will help expedite the prosecution of non-violent crime cases like retail store robberies and catalytic converters.

  • Increase the Office of the Medical Examiner’s laboratory budget by 12.5% ​​to add two full-time toxicologists, offer competitive salaries and create a career ladder for experienced staff. A $500,000 increase in crime lab funding will add two forensic firearms examiners.

Public health — This budget:

  • Allocating $1.5 million in Opioid Settlement Funds to expand the Addiction Improvement Coordinating Team and continuing our efforts to provide naloxone dispensing boxes throughout the community to help prevent overdose death.

  • Providing $175,000 to expand the successful TRYBE Ecotherapy Program for veterans. This program offers nature-based therapy to promote health, healing and recovery. Data so far shows a 70% reduction in PTSD symptoms among participants. The additional funding will allow us to double the number of veterans who can participate in the program

  • Provides additional funding for early intervention services and preschool special education and adds two bilingual health services coordinators to help families find the services children need. In addition, preschool special education reimbursement rates will increase by 5% for the third consecutive year, consistent with this administration’s commitment to increase these rates by a total of 15%.

  • Further investing $1.4 million in our community integration model, so people can access support services through trusted partner organizations directly in their own neighborhoods – a key recommendation from the Commission on racial and structural equity.

Economic development — This budget:

  • Funds construction of a new Applied Technology Center at Monroe Community College, increasing opportunities for students to receive training in high-demand skilled trades.

  • Pursues the internal minority and women-owned business certification program offered by the Department of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. This successful program – another key recommendation of the RASE commission – increases opportunities for MWBEs to bid on local and county contracts.

  • Continues to modernize the Monroe County Industrial Development Agency through its support of workforce training programs such as the Young Manufacturers Training Program, or YAMTEP, and through the Training Program in multi-professional learning, or MAPP.

  • Continues this administration’s commitment to increase support for small and medium-sized arts groups by doubling county funding for these organizations and providing $60,000 in annual support to the Hochstein School of Music, Garth Fagan Dance and at the Black Box Theater Avenue.

Community infrastructure — This budget:

  • Continuation of renovations at Seneca Park Zoo, for the new main entrance and the tropical complex.

  • Continues ongoing renovations to accommodate MLB-mandated upgrades and enhance the fan experience at Frontier Field – soon to become Innovative Field.

  • Invests in the county’s human infrastructure of dedicated employees by funding a block pay increase for all employees, retention bonuses, and a pay raise for social service workers, including social workers, examiners, child protective services staff, child detention staff and probation staff.

  • Creates an Office of Environmental Quality to oversee and coordinate efforts to implement Phase I of the county’s climate action plan, which calls for an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from county operations.

  • Provides for a new Chief Information Security Officer to guard against hacking and ensure the confidentiality and integrity of data, networks and all critical IT infrastructure in the county.

“This 2023 budget proposal is a smart and fiscally responsible plan that continues our work to bring Monroe back, funds our police, and makes key investments in public safety, public health and welfare, economic and labor development. -work and in the restoration and reconstruction of the critical community. infrastructure that contributes to our quality of life,” said County Executive Bello. “This plan continues the sound financial practices that prompted the three major credit rating agencies to recently award Monroe County its highest ratings in two decades and supports the stimulus package I outlined in my speech on the 2022 county state.

The Monroe County Legislature will consider the spending plan for adoption at its Dec. 13 meeting.

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White House releases net zero roadmap https://gnet.org/white-house-releases-net-zero-roadmap/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:50:00 +0000 https://gnet.org/white-house-releases-net-zero-roadmap/ The White House this morning announced a new initiative to help achieve net-zero emissions and promised to direct research and billions of federal dollars toward 37 “game-changing” energy technologies. The Net-Zero Game Changers initiative, as it is called, is led by a 17-agency task force, chaired by President Joe Biden’s climate advisers. The administration also […]]]>

The White House this morning announced a new initiative to help achieve net-zero emissions and promised to direct research and billions of federal dollars toward 37 “game-changing” energy technologies.

The Net-Zero Game Changers initiative, as it is called, is led by a 17-agency task force, chaired by President Joe Biden’s climate advisers. The administration also released a new roadmap identifying five initial key areas for energy research and development to achieve net zero by 2050: power grids, aviation, fusion energy, efficient buildings and net zero fuels and industrial products.

According to the administration, scaling up federal work in these five areas could generate climate jobs and environmental justice benefits and improve the nation’s energy security.

“The purpose of this exercise is to accelerate deployment even faster and further,” Arati Prabhakar, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, said in a call with reporters yesterday.

As part of the initiative, the administration will pour funds from the bipartisan Infrastructure Act, the CHIPS and Science Act and the Cut Inflation Act into the five areas, the White House said. . Federal agencies will also strengthen their own coordination in priority areas and establish roadmaps to improve technologies at the laboratory scale and to generalize them.

Shalanda Young, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, said on the call that the new roadmap will serve as a “comprehensive climate innovation strategy to help guide all of these investments.”

The White House said it has identified the 37 categories of “game-changing” technologies in federal agencies. They include advanced forms of nuclear, solar and geothermal power generation; advanced batteries, electric planes and high-speed trains; low carbon forms of aluminum, chemicals and concrete; emission reductions from livestock and agriculture; and direct air capture or other forms of CO2 removal.

The initiative is based on the idea that the Paris target of zeroing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 is unattainable without new or vastly improved forms of energy. The International Energy Agency has concluded that nearly half of the emissions reductions needed to reach net zero will have to come from technologies in the demonstration or prototype stage – a conclusion cited by the White House task force .

“Success will require a nearly complete transformation of today’s energy system” – something that would require “unprecedented effort, scale and creativity,” the task force wrote in the roadmap.

However, some of the technologies supported by the White House have come under criticism. Carbon capture and its associated transport and storage infrastructure, for example, are hated by some environmentalists who say they prolong the use of fossil fuels and are expensive.

The administration also announced an initial $1.5 billion in Cut Inflation Act grants to build and upgrade facilities at the nation’s national laboratories, ranging from basic energy science programs fusion energy and advanced computing.

“America is investing heavily in science today to enable the solutions of tomorrow,” Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said on the call.

Clean energy innovation, among other types of science and technology, would thwart China’s influence, she argued.

“Two decades ago, we invested up to five times more than China in development, and now we’re barely ahead,” she said.

With new federal funds due to come out of Biden-backed laws, she added, “we can stop giving ground.”

This story also appears in Climate wire.

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A green bond invests in the best of Rhode Island https://gnet.org/a-green-bond-invests-in-the-best-of-rhode-island/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://gnet.org/a-green-bond-invests-in-the-best-of-rhode-island/ For the editor, On November 8, the Rhode Islanders will have many important choices to make in the voting booths. I ask you to consider voting yes on referendum question #3, the Green Bond. If approved, proceeds from this $50 million measure will provide a cleaner, greener and fairer Rhode Island. For decades, Green Bond […]]]>

For the editor,

On November 8, the Rhode Islanders will have many important choices to make in the voting booths. I ask you to consider voting yes on referendum question #3, the Green Bond. If approved, proceeds from this $50 million measure will provide a cleaner, greener and fairer Rhode Island.

For decades, Green Bond financing has helped protect Narragansett Bay and clean water, strengthen the state against global warming, reclaim contaminated urban brownfields for productive reuse, conserve open spaces and construct recreational facilities and playgrounds to benefit the 39 cities and towns of our state. The 2022 Green Bond will also allow the Roger Williams Park Zoo – one of Rhode Island’s premier cultural institutions and tourist attractions – to build a carbon-neutral education center and event pavilion where Zoo leaders and programs will inspire the next generation of conservation advocates to save the planet.

For the Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council (WRWC), previous green bond referendum funds were a game-changer.

Formed over 20 years ago, the WRWC’s mission is to create positive environmental, social and economic change by revitalizing the Woonasquatucket River, its greenway and its communities. The Woonasquatucket River has been a cherished part of the ancestral lands of the Narragansett Indian Tribe since time immemorial and remains a gathering place, a productive ecosystem and a waterway. This small but influential river flows from North Smithfield and Gloucester through Smithfield, North Providence, Johnston and Providence. It shares a similar industrial history with the Blackstone River and has suffered the same legacy of pollution. From the 1960s through the 1990s, the Woonasquatucket was hard to find and lined with abandoned and contaminated industrial sites. Trash and debris filled its overgrown banks. In the Olneyville neighborhood of Providence, children climbed over huge piles of illegally dumped debris in search of places to play.

With the help of federal funding secured by U.S. Senators John Chafee and Jack Reed, state funding largely funded by green bonds, and significant private investment, the Woonasquatucket River Cleanup has started. The Woonasquatucket River Greenway (Greenway), a seven-mile urban pathway connecting parks and green spaces in five neighborhoods in Providence and the City of Johnston, has been the catalyst for the revitalization of the river and the community through the vision of project founders Fred Lippitt and Jane Sherman.

From the beginning of serious cleanup in the late 1990s until today, the Greenway and the investments it has spurred have restored the health of the river and the communities it touches. Where once stood a dangerous pile of rubble that was once the Riverside Mills complex in Olneyville, now stands the gleaming Riverside Park. It features outdoor classrooms, picnic pavilions, community-built playgrounds, a community garden, pollinator gardens and a boat launch encouraging city dwellers, especially young people to enjoy canoeing and kayaking – activities they probably wouldn’t have experienced otherwise.

The Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council believes that as a culture and society, we can never be content with creating and defending safe and healthy spaces to enjoy nature. To find peace. And breathe. That’s why we’re so passionate about the 2022 Green Bond. Its proceeds will go to projects that improve the lives of all Rhode Islanders. In addition, the bond will strengthen Rhode Island against global warming, reducing our risks, prioritizing equity, and improving public safety.

If clean water, climate justice, preserving open spaces, urban revitalization and other fundamental issues matter to you, please vote Yes out of 3!

Alicia J. Lehrer

Executive Director of Woonasquatucket River Watershed Council

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New conservation fund to protect undeveloped barrier island – Statehouse Report https://gnet.org/new-conservation-fund-to-protect-undeveloped-barrier-island-statehouse-report/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 19:14:26 +0000 https://gnet.org/new-conservation-fund-to-protect-undeveloped-barrier-island-statehouse-report/ Waites Island. Photo by Steve Walker on Flickr.com Staff reports | Efforts to protect the last undeveloped barrier island in Horry County on the eastern tip of South Carolina have taken a huge leap forward with two $500,000 donations to a new fund to protect land. Google donated $500,000 to the new Land and Water […]]]>
Waites Island. Photo by Steve Walker on Flickr.com

Staff reports | Efforts to protect the last undeveloped barrier island in Horry County on the eastern tip of South Carolina have taken a huge leap forward with two $500,000 donations to a new fund to protect land.

Google donated $500,000 to the new Land and Water Action Fund in Maintain SC, a corporate-backed conservation initiative to leverage private sector dollars with county, state and federal dollars to accelerate the protection of critical state resources. Google’s donation, which was announced Thursday, has leveraged a $500,000 matching grant from the Waccamaw Community Foundation, according to a press release.

“This is a significant inflection point in conservation funding in South Carolina,” SC Sen said. Chip Campsen, a Charleston Republican considered by many to be the father of the state-funded SC Conservation Bank, which has protected nearly 250,000 acres of land over the past two decades.

“Sustain SC’s private sector dollars will become an important source of recurring matching funds to continue the South Carolina Conservation Bank’s mission to protect South Carolina’s beautiful places,” he said today.

Funding from the Google grant will be used to permanently protect a portion of Waites Island, a barrier of over 1,000 acres near the North Carolina border. It is one of the last undeveloped and unprotected barrier islands in the southeast, according to the statement.

The Open Space Institute, a leading conservation organization, is the first recipient of money from Sustain SC’s new fund. Earlier this year, he purchased 260 acres of the island just northeast of North Myrtle Beach. Much of the rest of the island is owned by a foundation, but some remains in private hands, according to a published report.

SC Department of Natural Resources Director Robert H. Boyles Jr. stressed the importance of protecting the island: “191 species of birds have been documented on Waites Island, which accounts for almost half of every species of bird found in our state,” he said. “The conservation of Waites Island will provide an oasis in a sea of ​​development for migratory birds, sea turtles and shorebirds, as well as the potential for restoration of the federally threatened beach pigweed.”

Governor Henry McMaster said he was pleased with the conservation announcement, “We have an incredible responsibility to preserve South Carolina’s natural beauty and foster sustainable growth as people around the world experience all that our state has to offer and settle here.

State gets big grant for electric school buses

In other conservation news, South Carolina received a $58 million grant to replace old diesel buses with new electric school buses in 16 school districts. Funded by federal infrastructure dollars, the state will replace 148 diesel buses with electric buses and install infrastructure to charge them.

“The transportation industry is the single largest source of pollution in the United States, and our children deserve a clean, healthy ride to school,” said John Tynan, executive director of Conservation Voters of South Carolina (CVSC). “The transition from a fossil fuel school bus fleet is an important step in improving our children’s health, the climate and the economy, and CVSC is thrilled that South Carolina is helping to open the way to a clean energy future.”

The initiative received bipartisan support, according to a CVSC press release.

“As an educator, I appreciate how these new electric school buses will contribute to cleaner air for our students, bus drivers, teachers and staff who work near bus loading areas” , said Sen. Mike Fanning, D-Fairfield.

SC Rep. Bill Herbkersman, R-Beaufort, added, “This funding is a win for South Carolinians of all ages. This will allow the Jasper School District to phase out four of its oldest, dirtiest diesel buses and replace them with all-new, zero-emission electric school buses that will mean cleaner air, healthier kids. health and provide clean energy jobs for people here. in South Carolina.

Among the school districts that will receive the new buses under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean School Bus program are Dorchester District Four and Georgetown County School District.

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View raises $200 million in convertible senior notes https://gnet.org/view-raises-200-million-in-convertible-senior-notes/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://gnet.org/view-raises-200-million-in-convertible-senior-notes/ MILPITAS, Calif., Oct. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — View (NASDAQ: VIEW) (“View” or the “Company”) today announced that it has raised $200 million in senior convertible bonds, which support View’s continued growth and path to profitability, following the inclusion of its smart windows in the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) under the recently passed Inflation Reduction […]]]>

MILPITAS, Calif., Oct. 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — View (NASDAQ: VIEW) (“View” or the “Company”) today announced that it has raised $200 million in senior convertible bonds, which support View’s continued growth and path to profitability, following the inclusion of its smart windows in the Investment Tax Credit (ITC) under the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act 2022 . The investment is being led by RXR-affiliated investment vehicles, with participation from USAA Real Estate, Anson Funds, and BNP Paribas Asset Management’s environmental strategies group, as well as other new and existing investors. Scott Rechler, president and CEO of RXR, will join the company’s board of directors.

“At View, we are committed to creating sustainable, experiential, healthier and smarter buildings. With the products and operations already in place, this capital allows us to scale our business to broad market adoption and profitability,” said Dr. Rao Mulpuri, CEO of View. “We are delighted to have such strong endorsements from leaders in the real estate industry. I am delighted to welcome Scott to our Board of Directors. more innovative, his knowledge of the real estate ecosystem and drive for positive change in the industry is a perfect fit with our mission, and he also adds substantial expertise to our Board of Directors through his extensive experience in public companies.”

“Smart windows represent one of the most effective ways to reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions from real estate,” said Scott Rechler, president and CEO of RXR. “View has thoughtfully built the intellectual property, comprehensive products, manufacturing capability, operational infrastructure, and most importantly, a thrilled customer base needed to transform the real estate industry. I look forward to working with Rao and the team. to quickly scale this platform into an even more successful business.”

Scott Rechler is the CEO and President of RXR. In addition to his role at RXR, Scott serves on the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Chairman of the Regional Plan Association (RPA), Director and Vice Chairman of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center , Member of the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY), Chairman of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Member of the Board of Trustees of Northwell Health, Member of the NYU Real Estate Institute Advisory Committee, Co-Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Tribeca Film Institute , board member of Drum Major Institute, Convene, Kitchen United and Hospital for Special Surgery. From 2011 to 2016, Scott served on the Board of Commissioners as Vice Chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and later served on the Board of Directors of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) of 2017 to 2019. He was previously the President and Chief Executive Officer of Reckson Associates Realty Corp. and board member of American Campus Communities, Inc.

“USAA Real Estate has direct experience with View Smart Windows as they have continued to refine their products over the past several years,” said Len O’Donnell, CEO of USAA Real Estate. “This is amazing technology that has the potential to transform our industry, and with the addition of the recent tax credit, it makes economic sense for anyone in the real estate industry to roll out across their entire wallet. We couldn’t be more excited to be part of View’s growth story. »

“We urgently need to reduce the carbon footprint of our built environment. View offers one of the best solutions to achieve this while making buildings smarter, healthier and more efficient,” said Edward Lees, Group Co-Head of Environmental Strategies at BNP Paribas Asset Management. “The Cut Inflation Act of 2022, which includes smart windows in ITC, will now accelerate the rollout of this innovative product which is already in use in a growing number of leading buildings.”

“Anson is delighted to participate in this strategic funding round that will launch View into its next stage of growth,” said Moez Kassam, CIO of Anson Funds, a leading alternative asset management firm focused on global real estate securities. . “View has a proven track record of smart window technology, helping its high-quality customer base reduce their environmental impact and we believe ITC will help accelerate adoption of this next-generation technology.”

For further details regarding the investment, please see the company’s current report on Form 8-K, filed October 27, 2022.

Management’s presentation is available on the Investor Relations website at View Investors.view.com/investor-relations

Forward-looking statements
This press release and certain documents View files with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), as well as information included in oral statements or other written statements made or to be made by View, other statements of historical fact, contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. These forward-looking statements are based on management’s current expectations, estimates, assumptions, projections and beliefs, which are subject to change. There can be no assurance that these forward-looking statements will be realized; these statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond View’s control and are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual results may differ materially from what is expressed or anticipated in such forward-looking statements. View’s business is subject to a number of risks which are further described in View’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 and its subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. View undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.

About the view
View is the leader in smart building technologies that transform buildings to improve human health and experience, reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions, and generate additional revenue for building owners. View Smart Windows uses artificial intelligence to automatically adapt to outdoor conditions, eliminating the need for blinds and increasing access to natural light. Every View installation includes a cloud-connected smart building platform that can easily be extended to reinvent the occupant experience. View’s products are installed in offices, apartments, airports, hotels and educational institutions. For more information, visit: www.view.com.

About RXR
RXR is an investor, developer and creator of innovative places committed to applying a client and community-centric approach to building properties, services and products that create lasting value for all stakeholders. Headquartered in New York with a national platform strategy, RXR is a vertically integrated operations and development company of more than 500 people, with expertise in a wide range of value creation activities, including real estate, infrastructure and industrial development, revealing value in underperforming properties. , repurposing well-located iconic properties, incorporating cutting-edge technologies and value-added loans. The RXR platform manages 93 commercial real estate properties and investments with an aggregate gross asset value of approximately $22.3 billion, comprising approximately 30.3 million square feet of commercial properties, a multi-family residential portfolio of approximately 7 600 units in operation or under development, and control of development rights for approximately 3,800 additional multi-family and for-sale units as of June 30, 2022. Gross asset value has been compiled by RXR in accordance with the valuation policy of fair value of the business and includes capital invested by RXR and its partners, as well as leverage. Visit RXR.com for more information.

About USAA Real Estate
Together with its affiliates, USAA Real Estate invests across the spectrum of risk for a global clientele, managing over $35 billion in net assets under management across a diversified portfolio in North America and Europe. USAA Real Estate provides strategic equity and debt capital, including to capitalize on the growing demand for technology-driven real estate assets, to address the critical need for housing solutions, and for other market and development opportunities. capital structure with compelling risk-return characteristics. For more information, please visit: www.usrealco.com.

For more information about View, Inc., please contact:

Samuel Meehan
See, Inc.
IR@View.com
408-493-1358

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Exploring the Biden-Harris Agenda for Climate and Justice with the Mitchell Center – The Maine Campus https://gnet.org/exploring-the-biden-harris-agenda-for-climate-and-justice-with-the-mitchell-center-the-maine-campus/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 07:08:06 +0000 https://gnet.org/exploring-the-biden-harris-agenda-for-climate-and-justice-with-the-mitchell-center-the-maine-campus/ On Monday, October 17, the Senator George J. Mitchell Center hosted a conference on the Biden administration’s climate change and justice agenda as part of its ongoing Sustainability Talks series. The center, located in Norman Smith Hall on the University of Maine campus, hosted keynote speaker David Cash, who is the current Regional Administrator of […]]]>

On Monday, October 17, the Senator George J. Mitchell Center hosted a conference on the Biden administration’s climate change and justice agenda as part of its ongoing Sustainability Talks series.

The center, located in Norman Smith Hall on the University of Maine campus, hosted keynote speaker David Cash, who is the current Regional Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of New England. Cash has dedicated his career to working with state governments, communities and the private sector to create policies around USHis work aims to address climate change, achieve environmental justice and other related areas which pose some of the most important problems in today’s society.

In his insightful discussion, Cash explored how the current presidential administration is addressing the looming threat of climate change through recent legislation.

“The EPA is a steward of approximately $100 billion that will go to states, tribes, communities and the private sector to get to the greenhouse gas neutral place we need to be,” Cash said. . “It will grow the clean energy economy that will provide prime jobs, and it will do it in a way where we center justice.”

When analyzing who to give funds to, it is important to remember who we need to protect the most. There are many underserved and diverse communities in the United States that have historically been neglected and left to struggle in times of need. Climate change affects everyone, and the administration’s goal is to prioritize low-income, diverse communities who often benefit the most from the intervention, but whose needs are disproportionately met.

In November 2021, President Biden signed an infrastructure bill that would bring $40 million this year to the state of Maine alone. Cash noted that these funds are intended to replace lead pipes and build drinking water and wastewater systems that will be resilient to climate change.

An additional $20 million has been granted to the state through the EPA to be used to clean up former industrial sites in many southern Maine communities to make way for economic development on those lands. . The selected sites will be redeveloped into commercial and residential spaces.

“Maine has done a really good job of converting these horrific community risks into assets,” Cash said.

Federal funding through the Inflation Reduction Act is also crucial as the United States takes a more aggressive approach to combating climate change. New investments will promote offshore wind, electric vehicles, heat pumps in homes and more. Cash reiterated a key goal of this law, which is to focus on environmental climate justice that will particularly benefit the nation’s diverse underserved communities. For example, a five-year program has been implemented to convert old school buses to electric buses so that children can get to school without diesel emissions.

Other renewable energy focuses, particularly offshore wind, are expected to greatly benefit the northeast by creating a need for manufacturing and job growth. Cash demonstrated that Maine has a lot to look forward to in the near future as it receives increased support from the federal government to do its part in addressing climate change while reaping the economic benefits that can come from long-term investments. .

To view a recording of Dr. Cash’s talk or to receive more information about upcoming sustainability talks this fall, visit https://umaine.edu/mitchellcenter/.

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