Advance takes action: Officials agree to tackle flooding on secondary roads near SI motorway

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STATEN ISLAND, NY – City and state agencies have agreed to come to the table to work on a solution to the extreme flooding that is occurring on a service road along the Staten Island Expressway in Meiers Cornersf.

Sheraden Avenue, one block from South Gannon Avenue along the freeway, is so badly inundated after periods of heavy rain that water circulates halfway up the block.

The flooding began in 2017 after the State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) erected the noise barrier along South Gannon Avenue and the Staten Island Freeway, residents told Advance / SILive. com.

The wall acts as a dam, blocking the natural runoff of water from surrounding streets that descend to the causeway, residents said.

Constant stormy days in July and Tropical Storm Henri last week caused thousands of dollars in damage to residents; the first floors, basements and cars were all ruined by heavy rains.

After Advance / SILive.com highlighted the issue, Assembly Member Michael Cusick (D-Mid-Island) was able to bring all concerned parties to the table to work on short and long term solutions.

Residents of Sheraden Avenue have suffered thousands, and in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars, in damage from heavy rains. Residents said when the noise barrier was built along South Gannon Avenue several years ago, the wall prevented rain runoff and caused the problem. (Photo courtesy of Miriam Berkovitz)

“The damage to residences, properties and quality of life repeatedly caused by the flooding of this intersection cannot continue,” Cusick said. “I have heard from countless members of the community and raised their concerns at the highest levels of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and NYS DOT. I have worked extensively with both agencies and together we have formulated short and long term solutions to this pressing problem.

DEP Commissioner Vincent Sapienza said: “In order to better manage stormwater in this region, we are advancing an investment project that will augment the existing drainage infrastructure. He thanked Cusick for “being a strong supporter of his constituents on this issue,” and said he looked forward to working with state partners on short-term measures that will bring some peace of mind. to residents.

“The New York State Department of Transportation is excited to work with our municipal government partners to resolve the flooding issues near Sheraden Avenue and looks forward to a successful resolution of this issue,” a door said. -speak of the DOT.

Residents of Sheraden Avenue were made aware of the plans during a recent video call with all parties.

Flooding on Sheraden Avenue

Residents of Sheraden Avenue have suffered thousands, and in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars, in damage from heavy rains. Residents said when the noise barrier was built along South Gannon Avenue several years ago, the wall prevented rain runoff and caused the problem. (Photo courtesy of Miriam Berkovitz)

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STATE DEVIED BEFORE THE CITY

Although the problem was apparently created when the DOT erected the noise barrier, the agency had previously said that subsequent flooding was not its problem and that it was a “local street and a local problem “.

“We understand that the sumps and drainage pipes were recently cleaned by NYC DEP, [city Department of Environmental Protection], which helped improve water flow during the last storm, ”a DOT official said previously.

DEP has previously confirmed and stated that catchment basins in the area will be inspected prior to scheduled rainfall events to ensure adequate drainage.

Flooding on Sheraden Avenue

Residents of Sheraden Avenue have suffered thousands, and in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars, in damage from heavy rains. Residents said when the noise barrier was built along South Gannon Avenue several years ago, the wall prevented rain runoff and caused the problem. (Photo courtesy of Miriam Berkovitz)

Sources with knowledge of the situation told Advance / SILive.com that while the sumps were free of debris and were operating at full capacity, they were not made to handle the surge and volume of water created by the wall.

“Sometimes the existing infrastructure is unable to handle the volume of water, especially during heavy rains,” a DEP spokesperson said. “That said, DEP is planning an investment project here to install new storm sewers to relieve the flooding.”

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